Galveston Cabs http://galvestoncabs.com We know the Island! Mon, 29 Jan 2018 18:04:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.6 http://galvestoncabs.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/cropped-galveston-map-cruise-taxi-32x32.png Galveston Cabs http://galvestoncabs.com 32 32 1900 Storm http://galvestoncabs.com/1900-storm-hurricaine/ Wed, 01 Nov 2017 16:50:41 +0000 http://galvestoncabs.com/?p=135 The post 1900 Storm appeared first on Galveston Cabs.

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The Great Hurricane of 1900

1900-galveston-storm-history  The Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900 was the deadliest natural event in United States history. To this day, it has been the deadliest hurricane and the second-most costly hurricane ever–second only to Katrina when adjusted for historical value. Some 8,000 people were left dead after the Category 4 storm made landfall on September 8, 1900.
To put this in perspective, Hurricane Katrina took the lives of about 1800 people. The entire island of Galveston naturally sits about eight feet above sea level. In a single day, some 3600 homes were destroyed when 15 foot waves and 145 mph winds surged over the entire island. Since the event, the island has been built up by about 17 feet and a 10 square mile seawall was also erected to prevent future storms from ever ravaging the island again.
seawall-construction-tour-cabBut after the 1900 event, the damage had been done. Investors pulled up stakes, cut their losses, and moved their businesses inland, toward Houston. That was the end of the Golden Era for Galveston. The hurricane happened before the practice of naming storms. The 1900 Storm was believed to have begun like most Atlantic storms–off the west coast of Africa. It was observed to be building into a “severe thunderstorm” as it approached the Caribbean. Cuban meteorologists warned their American counterparts that the storm was building–but they were ignored.
1900_Galveston_hurricane_trackBy the time the storm arrived to Florida, the U. S. Weather Bureau was reporting only a “moderate storm” and not a hurricane. The day before the storm hit Galveston, it created heavy damage along the Louisiana and Mississippi coasts. However, due to damaged telegraph lines, communication was limited. The storm hit Galveston with inadequate warning, and almost no one was prepared. Disaster ensued. At the time, Galveston was booming. The city was founded in 1839 and had grown wealthy as Texas’ largest natural harbor along the Gulf of Mexico. It was a center of international trade, and one of the state’s largest cities. By 1900, its population had reached 36,000 residents. It was known as the “Ellis Island of the West” and the “Wall Street of the Southwest.” In less than 24 hours, the city was almost completely destroyed.

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Hurricane Ike Tree Sculptures http://galvestoncabs.com/hurricane-ike-tree-sculptures/ Sat, 28 Oct 2017 17:36:36 +0000 http://galvestoncabs.com/?p=109 Hurricane Ike Tree Sculptures In 2008, Galveston was ravaged by Hurricane Ike. Thousands of old growth trees on the island were destroyed, uprooted by the wind and rain, and poisoned by salt water. Some 35,000 trees were lost in the storm and its aftermath. Since then, local artists have used Mother Nature’s fury as part […]

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Hurricane Ike Tree Sculptures
ike-taxi-airport-hobbyIn 2008, Galveston was ravaged by Hurricane Ike. Thousands of old growth trees on the island were destroyed, uprooted by the wind and rain, and poisoned by salt water. Some 35,000 trees were lost in the storm and its aftermath. Since then, local artists have used Mother Nature’s fury as part of a new expression. Dozens of the dead trees left standing have been carved into whimsical sculptures.

 


tin-man-ike-tree-sculptureTowering oaks have new life as angels, mermaids and animals. Historical devastation never looked so monumental. Other tree sculptures feature dolphins, pelicans, sea turtles and detailed portraits of gods and goddesses. Some pieces have local significance. For example, there’s a carving of Toto and the Tin Man from the “Wizard of Oz” outside the house at Winnie and 17th Streets, a nod to King Vidor, the secondary director of the film who was born at that house. Another sculpture, outside a bed-and-breakfast cum rescue bunny sanctuary at 17th and Postoffice Streets, features an angel cradling a bunny.
dog-ike-sculpture-cab-toursGalveston City Hall now features two of these sculptures–a Dalmatian and a fire hydrant created by local artist Jim Phillips. He’s also done the live oak version of “Venus on a Half Shell.” Another standout is an homage to Galveston’s native wildlife by local artist Dayle Lewis. This sculpted live oak has new life featuring elaborate relief carvings of plants and small animals around the trunk and 17 birds taking flight in the branches above.
This sculpture is located on Sealy Avenue between 16th and 17th Streets. Another by the same artist is located behind the Mosquito Cafe–a local favorite–and features a detailed carving of three pelicans and a fish. But many of the most elaborate art pieces are nestled between classic Victorian houses, hidden in manicured gardens, off the main streets of the East End Historical District. If you want to experience the best of these, you’ll need to ask a local. Or better still–find a taxi service that specializes in private tours. Brochure guides are also available from the Convention and Visitor’s Bureau.

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Sound Bar | Karaokee http://galvestoncabs.com/sound-bar-karaokee/ Sat, 28 Oct 2017 17:24:38 +0000 http://galvestoncabs.com/?p=104 Galveston| Strand District

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Galveston| Strand District

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History of the Taxi Cab http://galvestoncabs.com/history-of-the-taxi-cab/ Sat, 28 Oct 2017 17:21:43 +0000 http://galvestoncabs.com/?p=100 Taxi cabs are an inextricable part of urban life. In every city on the planet, people need to move, and taxis are always there to move them. Generations have acclimated to having rides available on demand, but how did the modern taxi cab come to be? The first taxis were horse-drawn, and known as hackney […]

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Taxi cabs are an inextricable part of urban life. In every city on the planet, people need to move, and taxis are always there to move them. Generations have acclimated to having rides available on demand, but how did the modern taxi cab come to be?

The first taxis were horse-drawn, and known as hackney carriages. They began operating in Paris and London in the early 17th century. Innkeepers in London made carriages available for hire. The first taxi rank would queue outside the Maypole Inn on The Strand, a major thoroughfare in the City of Westminster in London. By 1635, the Hackney Carriage Act was passed by Parliament which formally legalized horse-drawn carriages for hire. As a result of the Ordinance for the Regulation of Hackney-Coachmen in London and the places adjacent, the first hackney carriages licenses were issued in 1662.

By the 19th century, the technology improved for hackney carriage designs. In 1834, Joseph Hansom, an architect from the city of York, designed an improved lighter, two-wheel horse-drawn coach. They were known as Hansom Cabs. Lighter and more nimble, the new design could be pulled by a single horse cutting costs for the operators. They were agile enough to steer around the old-style coaches stuck in traffic jams on the streets of London. The Hansom cabs soon replaced the hackney carriages entirely. They quickly spread to other cities in the United Kingdom and then all over Europe. During the late 19th century, cabs arrived to the United States, especially in New York City.

The next era was dominated by electric battery power. In 1897, Walter C. Bersey designed a fleet of electric battery-powered cabs, with no horse required. They were soon driving on London streets. These cabs were nicknamed “Hummingbirds” because of the distinct sound of their engines. In the same year, Samuel’s Electric Carriage & Wagon Company introduced a fleet of 12 electric cabs in New York City.

The next innovation was the taxi meter, which was created by three German inventors: Wilhelm Friedrich Nedler, Ferdinand Dencker and Friedrich Wilhelm Gustav Bruhn.

Next began the era of gasoline powered cabs. In 1897, the Gottlieb Daimler Corporation introduced a fleet of gasoline powered cabs to Stuttgart, Germany. Soon after, the gasoline taxis, called Daimler Victorias, were operating in Paris, then London, then last to New York City. It was 1907 when the first gasoline-powered taxis arrived to the Big Apple. New York City’s first taxis were imported from France by the Allen-Kingston Motor Car Company.

In America, the very first gasoline powered taxis were manufactured in Bristol, Connecticut by Bristol Engineering starting in 1908. The company was owned by Albert F. Rockwell, and the taxis were engineered by Fred E. Moskovics a former employee of Daimler in the late 1890s. It was the company owner’s wife who suggested the taxis be painted bright yellow to make them stand out. It was later Rockwell who started the first Yellow Taxicab Company in New York City.

In the 20th century, the use of gasoline-powered taxi cabs spread all over the world. By the 1940s, two-way radios were introduced. Soon after, modern dispatch offices were used to streamline communication to taxi drives to better meet customer demand. By the 1980s, the dispatch process became computerized, making dispatch even more efficient.

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